Understanding the 20 Different Types of Students and How to Deal With Them

Do you ever feel like you’re talking to a brick wall? Or like you’re pulling teeth to get your students to participate? Are you wondering about the types of students in your class? If so, you’re not alone. 

Every teacher has to deal with different types of students, and knowing how to reach them all can be tough.

But don’t worry; help is here! In this article, we’ll look at 20 different types of students and how to deal with them. 

We’ll cover everything from the gifted and talented to the struggling learners. So whether you’re a seasoned teacher or just starting, this article is for you.

Let’s get started!

How Is A Personality Developed in a Classroom?

Personality is developed in a classroom through a variety of ways, including:

Interactions with teachers and peers

Students learn about themselves and others through their interactions with teachers and peers. They learn how to behave in different situations, deal with conflict, and work cooperatively.

The curriculum

The curriculum can also shape students’ personalities. For example, a curriculum emphasizing creativity and innovation may help students develop more open-minded and adventurous personalities.

Extracurricular activities

Extracurricular activities can also play a role in personality development. For example, students who participate in sports may learn about teamwork and discipline, while students who participate in drama may learn about self-expression and communication.

The types of students in a classroom can also influence personality development. For example, students surrounded by other high-achieving students may be more motivated to succeed. In contrast, students surrounded by other struggling students may be more likely to give up easily.

It is important to note that personality development is a complex process influenced by various factors. The classroom is just one of many factors that can shape a student’s personality.

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What Types Of Students Are There?

Here are 20 types of Students you can find in a classroom:

  • Overactive
  • Teacher’s Pet
  • Hard Worker
  • Star
  • Intellectual Outsider
  • Clown
  • Clueless
  • Nerd
  • Artist
  • The Assertive types
  • Bully
  • Natural Leader
  • Slacker
  • The Student-Athletes
  • The Late Comers
  • Introvert types
  • Extrovert types
  • The Sleepyhead
  • The Musical types
  • The Gossip

1. Overactive

Overactive students are often high-energy and have a hard time sitting still. They may fidget, talk excessively, or have trouble staying focused. Overactive students can be challenging for teachers but can also be fun. 

How to Deal With Them

  • Provide plenty of opportunities for physical activity. Overactive students need to burn off energy for plenty of opportunities to move around. This could include taking breaks to walk around the classroom, playing active games, or participating in sports.
  • Break down tasks into smaller steps. Overactive students can get easily overwhelmed by large tasks. Break down tasks into smaller, more manageable steps so they don’t feel discouraged.
  • Set clear expectations. Make sure overactive students know what is expected of them. This could include setting specific goals, providing clear instructions, and giving feedback on their progress.
  • Be patient and understanding. Overactive students often have trouble controlling their behavior. Be patient and understanding, and help them to develop coping skills.

Teacher’s Pet

A teacher’s pet is a student given special treatment by the teacher, often because they are seen as more intelligent or hardworking than the other students. This can lead to resentment from other students, who may feel that the teacher’s pet does not deserve special treatment.

How to Deal with Them

  • Be fair and impartial. Treat all students equally, regardless of their academic performance, participation in class, or personal relationship with you. This means calling on all students to answer questions, giving everyone the same opportunities to participate in class activities, and providing feedback on all students’ work.
  • Encourage participation from all students. Create a classroom environment where all students feel comfortable participating in class discussions and activities. This can be done by calling on students randomly, using various teaching methods, and providing opportunities for students to work in small groups or pairs.
  • Set clear expectations. Ensure all students know what is expected of them in your class. This includes expectations for behavior, academic performance, and participation.
  • Be consistent. Be consistent in your expectations and your enforcement of rules. This will help students to understand what is expected of them and learn how to behave appropriately in your classroom.

3. Hard Worker

A hard-worker type of student is always willing to put in the extra effort to succeed. They are often motivated by a desire to learn and to do their best. Hard worker students are usually successful in school, but they may also struggle at times. 

How to Deal With Them

  • Recognize their efforts. Hard worker students often go unnoticed, so it is important to recognize their efforts. This can be done by giving them positive feedback, calling on them in class, or assigning them leadership roles.
  • Challenge them. Hard worker students are often eager to learn new things, so it is important to challenge them. This can be done by assigning them more difficult tasks, providing additional resources, or encouraging them to participate in extracurricular activities.
  • Provide support. Hard worker students may sometimes need support, especially when facing challenges. This can be done by providing extra help, encouraging, or connecting them with resources.
  • Encourage them to collaborate. Hard worker students can often benefit from collaborating with others. This can help them to learn from each other, share ideas, and develop new skills.

4. Star

A star student is a student who consistently performs at a high level academically, socially, or athletically. They are often leaders in their class and are well-liked by their peers and teachers. Star students are typically motivated and hardworking and set high standards for themselves. They are also often creative and innovative and do not fear taking risks.

How to Deal With Them

  • Recognize their potential. Star students are often capable of achieving great things, so it’s important to recognize their potential and provide them with opportunities to grow and develop.
  • Challenge them. Star students are often bored by easy work, so it’s important to challenge them with new and challenging material. This will help them to reach their full potential and avoid becoming complacent.
  • Provide them with opportunities to lead. Star students are often natural leaders, so it’s providing them with opportunities to lead projects and groups is important. This will help them to develop their leadership skills and build confidence.
  • Be supportive. Star students often feel pressure to succeed, so being supportive and understanding is important. Let them know you believe in them and are there to help them succeed.
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5. Intellectual Outsider

Intellectual outsiders are often highly intelligent and curious students who may feel like they don’t fit in with the other students in their class. They may be more interested in books and ideas than sports or popular culture, and they may prefer spending time alone or with a small group of close friends.

How to Deal With Them

Recognize their strengths. Intellectual outsiders are often highly intelligent and curious, so it’s important to recognize their strengths and provide them with opportunities to use their skills.

  • Challenge them intellectually. Intellectual outsiders are often bored by easy work, so it’s important to challenge them intellectually. This could involve giving them more complex assignments, assigning them to independent research projects, or encouraging them to participate in extracurricular activities that challenge them intellectually.
  • Respect their need for independence. Intellectual outsiders often prefer to work independently, so disrespecting their need for independence is important. This means giving them plenty of opportunities to work independently and explore their interests.
  • Provide them with opportunities to collaborate with others. Although intellectual outsiders often prefer to work independently, they can also benefit from collaborating. This can help them to develop their social skills and to learn how to work with others.

6. Clown

A clown type of student is a student who is always ready with a funny comment or quip. They may cause serious disruptions in the classroom, while others help engage other students with learning. The latter type of class clown is often popular with students and teachers.

How to Deal With Them

  • Talk to them privately. The first step is to talk to the student privately and explain that their behavior is disruptive and is preventing other students from learning. Be specific about unacceptable behaviors and explain the consequences for continuing to disrupt the class.
  • Set clear expectations. Once you have talked to the student, setting clear expectations for their behavior is important. This could include asking them to raise their hand before speaking, staying on task, and respecting other students.
  • Be consistent. It is important to be consistent with your enforcement of the rules. If you allow the student to get away with disruptive behavior once, they are more likely to continue to do it.
  • Provide positive reinforcement. When the student is behaving appropriately, be sure to praise them. This will help them to understand what is expected of them and to continue to behave positively.

7. Clueless

Clueless students seem to have no idea what is going on in class. They may be frequently confused, ask questions that have already been answered, or make careless mistakes. 

How to Deal With Them

  • Talk to them privately. The first step is to talk to the student privately and find out why they are struggling. Once you understand the reason for their struggles, you can start to address the underlying issue.
  • Provide extra help. If the student struggles with the material, provide them with extra help. This could include tutoring, study groups, or one-on-one help from you.
  • Be patient. It may take time for the student to catch up. Be patient and understanding, and eventually, the student will be able to succeed.
  • Get help from parents or guardians. If you are having trouble helping the student, getting help from their parents or guardians may be helpful. They may be able to provide additional support and guidance to the student.

8. Nerd

A nerd type of student is typically intelligent, passionate about their studies, and may be shy or introverted. They may be interested in science, math, technology, or other academic subjects. Nerd types of students can be great assets to the classroom and can often make significant contributions to their school and community.

How to Deal With Them

  • Be patient. Nerd types of students may take longer to warm up to people, so be patient and give them time to get to know you.
  • Be understanding. Nerd types of students may differ from others, so understand their quirks and eccentricities.
  • Help them to make friends. Nerd types of students may have difficulty making friends, so help them to connect with other students who share their interests.
  • Encourage their interests. Nerd types of students are often passionate about their interests, so encourage them to pursue their passions.

9. Artist

Artist types of students are often creative and expressive. They may be interested in painting, drawing, sculpting, or other art forms. Artist types of students can be great assets to the classroom and can often make significant contributions to their school and community.

How to Deal With Them

  • Be supportive. Artist types of students may need your support, so be there for them when needed.
  • Encourage their interests. Artist types of students are often passionate about their interests, so encourage them to pursue their passions.
  • Help them to find opportunities to express themselves creatively. Artist types of students need opportunities to express themselves creatively, so help them to find ways to do so. This could include providing art supplies, encouraging them to join art clubs or classes, or simply giving them time to create in your classroom.
  • Be patient. Artist types of students may not always be the most organized or focused, so be patient with them.

10. The Assertive types

Assertive students are often confident and outgoing. They are not afraid to speak up for themselves or their ideas. They can be great assets to the classroom and often make significant contributions to their school and community.

How to Deal With Them

  • Be respectful. Assertive students deserve to be treated with respect. This means listening to them when they speak, valuing their opinions, and giving them the same opportunities as other students.
  • Be open to their ideas. Assertive students often have great ideas. Be open to listening to their ideas and considering them seriously.
  • Encourage their leadership skills. Assertive students can be great leaders. Encourage them to take on leadership roles in the classroom and the school community.
  • Set clear expectations. It is important to set clear expectations for assertive students. This means letting them know what is acceptable behavior and what is not.

11. Bully

Bullying students use their power or strength to intimidate or harm others. They may use physical force, words, or social exclusion. Bully students can be of any age, race, gender, or social status. They may be popular or unpopular, smart or not so smart, athletic or not so athletic.

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How to Deal With Them

  • Be confident. Bullies often target kids who they perceive as being weak or vulnerable. If you can project an image of confidence, bullies are less likely to pick on you.
  • Be assertive. If a bully tries to pick on you, don’t be afraid to stand up for yourself. This doesn’t mean that you have to fight back physically. You can simply assert yourself verbally by telling the bully to stop.
  • Have friends. Bullies are less likely to target kids who have friends. Ensure you have a strong social circle of friends who will support you if you are bullied.
  • Don’t be afraid to report bullying. If you are being bullied, reporting it to a trusted adult is important. This could include a parent, teacher, counselor, or other adult you trust. A trusted adult can help you to deal with the bullying and to protect yourself from further harm.

12. Natural Leader

Natural leader students are born with the ability to influence and motivate others. They are often confident, outgoing, and have a strong sense of purpose. Natural leader students can be found in all walks of life, but they are often found in leadership positions in school, sports, and the workplace.

How to Deal With Them

  • Encourage their leadership skills. Natural leader students are often eager to take on leadership roles. Encourage them to do so, and provide them opportunities to develop their leadership skills.
  • Set clear expectations. Ensure that natural leader students know what is expected of them regarding their behavior and academic performance.
  • Provide feedback. Provide natural leader students with regular feedback on their work and behavior. This will help them to improve and to develop their leadership skills.
  • Be patient. Natural leader students may sometimes make mistakes. Be patient with them and help them to learn from their mistakes.

13. Slacker

A slacker student does not put much effort into their studies. They may procrastinate, miss classes, and turn in assignments late or incomplete. Slacker students may also have a negative attitude toward school and learning.

How to Deal With Them

  • Be patient and understanding. It’s important to remember that there are many reasons why a student might be slacking off. They may be struggling with their studies, dealing with personal problems, or not interested in school. Try to be patient and understanding, and work with the student to find ways to help them succeed.
  • Set clear expectations. Let the student know what you expect from them regarding attendance, participation, and grades. Be specific and realistic, and make sure the student understands the consequences of not meeting your expectations.
  • Provide regular feedback. Give the student regular feedback on their work, both positive and negative. This will help them stay on track and ensure they are on the right path to success.
  • Offer help and support. If the student is struggling, offer them help and support. This could include tutoring, study groups, or simply being available to answer questions.

14. The Student-Athletes

Student-athletes are students who participate in intercollegiate athletics. They are often under a lot of pressure to academically and athletically succeed. This can be a challenge, but it can also be a great opportunity.

How to Deal With Them

  • Be understanding of their busy schedules. Student-athletes have a lot on their plates, so it’s important to be understanding of their busy schedules. Be flexible with deadlines and assignments, and be willing to work with them to find a solution that works for everyone.
  • Encourage them to prioritize their studies. Student-athletes need to make sure that they are prioritizing their studies. This means being organized and managing their time effectively. It also means being willing to refuse social activities and other commitments that could interfere with their studies.
  • Provide them with resources and support. Many resources are available to student-athletes, such as tutoring, study groups, and academic advising. Ensure you are aware of these resources and encourage student-athletes to take advantage of them.
  • Be a positive role model. Student-athletes look up to their professors and coaches. Be a positive role model by setting a good example in terms of your own work ethic and academic performance.

15. The Late Comers

A latecomer is a student who is frequently late to class. There are various reasons why a student might be late, including transportation issues, personal issues, procrastination, etc.

How to Deal With Them

  • Be understanding and patient. There are many reasons why a student might be late for class. They may have transportation problems, be struggling with their studies, or simply be forgetful. Try to be understanding and patient, and work with the student to find a solution that works for everyone.
  • Set clear expectations. Let the student know what you expect from them in terms of attendance. Be specific and realistic, and make sure the student understands the consequences of not meeting your expectations.
  • Provide regular feedback. Give the student regular feedback on their attendance. This will help them stay on track and make sure they are meeting your expectations.
  • Offer help and support. If students struggle to arrive on time, offer them help and support. This could include providing transportation options, helping them develop a study schedule, or simply being available to answer questions.

16. Introvert types

Introverted Ones are often described as quiet, reserved, and independent. They prefer to spend time alone in class or with close friends and family and often feel drained by social interactions. Introverted Ones are often driven by a strong sense of duty and responsibility and are often perfectionists.

How to Deal With Them

  • Be understanding: Introverted students may be quiet and reserved, but they can still learn and achieve great things. Be patient and understanding, and don’t force them to participate in activities that they are not comfortable with.
  • Offer them choices: Introverted students may not be comfortable speaking up in class, so offer them choices about how they can participate. For example, you could let them write down their answers to questions instead of raising their hands.
  • Create a safe space: Introverted students need to feel safe and comfortable to learn. Create a positive and supportive environment in your classroom, and let them know they are not alone.
  • Provide individual attention: Introverted students may need more attention than extroverted students. Ensure to check in with them regularly and offer them help and support when needed.

17. Extrovert types

Extroverted students are typically outgoing, energetic, and friendly. They enjoy being around people and often learn best by interacting with others. 

How to Deal With Them

  • Encourage participation: Extroverted students are often eager to participate in class discussions and activities. Encourage them to share their ideas and opinions and help their classmates.
  • Provide leadership opportunities: Extroverted students often enjoy taking on leadership roles. Provide them opportunities to lead group projects, serve as class representatives, or participate in extracurricular activities.
  • Set clear expectations: Extroverted students can sometimes be disruptive in class. Set clear expectations for behavior and be consistent in enforcing those expectations.
  • Balance group work with individual work: Extroverted students may prefer to work in groups but also need individual work opportunities. Balance group work with individual assignments to give extroverted students a chance to work on their own.
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18. The Sleepyhead

A sleepyhead student is a student who is often tired and may fall asleep in class. There are many reasons why a student might be sleepy, including lack of sleep, medical conditions, medications, etc.

How to Deal With Them

  • Be understanding: Sleepyhead students may be unable to help to be tired. Be patient and understanding, and don’t make them feel bad about being sleepy.
  • Offer help: If a sleepyhead student struggles to stay awake in class, offer help. You could let them sit in front of the class or provide them with a quiet place to rest.
  • Encourage them to get enough sleep: Talk to sleepyhead students about the importance of getting enough sleep. Encourage them to develop healthy sleep habits.
  • Refer them to a doctor: If a sleepyhead student has trouble sleeping for over two weeks, refer them to a doctor. There may be an underlying medical condition that is causing their sleep problems.

19. The Musical types

Musical students are typically creative, expressive, and passionate about music. They often have a strong sense of rhythm and melody and may be skilled at playing an instrument or singing. 

How to Deal With Them

  • Encourage their creativity: Musical students often have a lot of creativity, so encourage them to express themselves through music. This could involve writing their songs, playing in a band, or simply singing in the shower.
  • Provide performance opportunities: Musical students often love to perform, so provide them with opportunities to do so. This could involve participating in school plays, concerts, or simply playing for their friends and family.
  • Help them to develop their skills: Musical students can benefit from instruction and practice. If they are interested in learning to play an instrument, help them find a teacher or resources online.
  • Be supportive: Musical students often need much support, so be there for them when needed. This could involve listening to them practice, attending their performances, or simply offering encouragement.

20. The Gossip

Gossiping students are those who enjoy talking about other people behind their backs. They may do this to feel better about themselves, gain power or control, or simply pass the time. Gossiping can be hurtful and damaging, creating a negative and toxic environment.

How to Deal With Them

  • Talk to the student privately: The first step is to talk to the student privately about their behavior. Explain that gossiping can be hurtful and that it can damage relationships.
  • Set clear expectations: Let the student know that you expect them to stop gossiping. Explain that if they continue to gossip, they will face consequences.
  • Be consistent: If the student continues to gossip, be consistent in enforcing the consequences. This will show the student that you are serious about your expectations.
  • Help the student find other ways to socialize: Gossiping can be a way for students to connect. Help the student find other socializing ways to socialize, such as joining clubs or sports teams.

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Understanding All Types of Students

There are many different types of students in any given classroom. Some students are naturally gifted and learn quickly; others need more time and support to succeed.

Some students are motivated and eager to learn, while others are more apathetic. And some students are social and outgoing, while others prefer to work alone.

Teachers need to understand the different types of students in their classrooms to tailor their instruction to meet the needs of all learners. 

By understanding the different types of students in their classroom and providing a variety of learning activities, teachers can help all students succeed.

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Tips for Teaching to Different Learning Styles

Use a variety of teaching methods

Don’t rely on lectures or textbooks alone. Use various teaching methods, such as group work, hands-on activities, and visual aids.

Provide opportunities for choice

Let students choose their learning activities whenever possible. This will help them stay engaged and motivated.

Provide feedback

Give students regular feedback on their work. This will help them identify their strengths and weaknesses and improve their learning.

Create a positive learning environment

Students feel safe, respected, and supported in a positive learning environment. This will help them reach their full potential.

Frequently Asked Questions

What are the different types of students?

There are many different types of students, each with unique learning styles, personalities, and needs. Some common types of students include:
Introverted students
Extroverted students
Sleepyhead students
Musical students
Gossip type of students

How can I understand the different types of students in my classroom?

The best way to understand the different types of students in your classroom is to get to know them individually. Take the time to talk to them, learn about their interests, and find out how they learn best. You can also use assessments to help you identify students’ strengths and weaknesses.

What are some challenges of dealing with different types of students?

One of the biggest challenges of dealing with different types of students is that it can be difficult to meet the needs of everyone. It is important to remember that not all students learn the same way and that some may require more support than others. It is also important to be patient and understanding, as some students may be more challenging than others.

What are some rewards of dealing with different types of students?

One of the biggest rewards of dealing with different types of students is seeing them succeed. When you can help a student overcome a challenge or achieve a goal, it is a very rewarding experience. Building relationships with students and seeing them grow and learn is also rewarding.

Conclusion

Students come in all shapes and sizes, with different learning styles, personalities, and needs. As a teacher, it is important to understand and deal with the different types of students in your classroom. 

It is important to remember that every student is different. There is no one-size-fits-all approach to dealing with students. The best way to deal with students is to understand their needs and tailor your approach accordingly.

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